amidstthetrees
amidstthetrees:

brittanias:


it’s a tricky business, playing a game in which you’re unsure of the pieces.and in this game, i fear losing is not an option.

#harold is going to a really dark place#harold is venturing into villain territory right now like ya’ll see that right#certainly not in the malicious sense#but his moral ambiguity is tipped way farther on the side of mastermind than ever before#he’s making more and more compromises to keep doing what they do#he still knows the difference between right and wrong#as evidenced by his horror at the deal root was setting up#but he and john are cutting deals with elias and stealing weapons and money with root#actively benefitting from the numbers however reluctantly that may be#it’s still about altruism but it isn’t altruism in practice anymore#harold has worked his whole life to do good while having the capability to do such much worse#and now he’s having to access that capability more than ever#doing the wrong things for the right reasons#that’s basically what i took away from this episode bc the rest of it was not grea 

I’ve believed since I started watching the show that Harold is only “good” because the people around him make him that way. If not for the people he surrounds himself with - likely, at least partly, because he WANTS to try and be good, because he knows on a personal level it is not something that comes naturally to him - he would be the villain of this story. Out and out, no doubt about it - Harold would be the villain.
He has all the hallmarks of a classic cyberpunk villain, down to nearly every last detail.
To top that off? The only people who have ever been compared to Harold, morally and intellectually, are themselves villains. Elias, Greer, Control, Root, hell, even Arthur in a twisted way - none of them are good people. They might have good intentions, sometimes, or at least morally grey ones - but good, on balance? They ain’t that.
I made a big post about this last week, and I’ve got a couple other posts I’m thinking about throwing up at some point (once they get fully-formed, thought-wise) that are kind of related, but basically… Harold Finch is not really a “hero.”
He’s a protagonist, certainly. But he isn’t a hero, and he isn’t a ‘good man’ through his own actions - he’s a good man through the influence of others. His father, Nathan, Grace, and, ironically, The Machine - who led him to Grace when he was teaching it morals, and Grace made him a better person, early on. John, Shaw, Fusco, Carter, and - amusingly - even Root have come to influence Harold’s morality since.
By and large, for the better; as The Machine gave Harold Grace, as a way of reminding him what he was trying to be, Harold gave Root the Machine, and her purpose, if somewhat indirectly. Since then, Root has been trying to get Harold to recognise his own responsibilities, and his own ability to contribute to what is going on.
No, scratch that - not his ability. The necessity of Harold’s involvement in the Cold War with Samaritan. And not just Harold-as-he-presents-himself, but Harold as he is. 
And behind all those identities, the “concerned third party” lines, the aloofness and emotional distance and intellect? Harold is still the man who created the world’s first AI, and unleashed it on the world to monitor everything that goes on in minute detail, so that it could learn and grow. Harold is the man who decided that his judgementsuperseded the privacy rights of every person on Earth. Decided that his new paradigm, his ability to change the world overnight, was more important than consulting anyone else on the morality of what he could do.
He knew that it could be done, so he did it.
That is Harold Finch, at his core. He is not a good man, though he does good things, sometimes. He is, frankly, a terrifying man. And what we’re seeing so far in Season 4 is suggesting we will only see more of Harold-as-he-is, and less of Harold-as-he-presents-himself, as time goes on.
And it’s amazing.

amidstthetrees:

brittanias:

it’s a tricky business, playing a game in which you’re unsure of the pieces.
and in this game, i fear losing is not an option.

I’ve believed since I started watching the show that Harold is only “good” because the people around him make him that way. If not for the people he surrounds himself with - likely, at least partly, because he WANTS to try and be good, because he knows on a personal level it is not something that comes naturally to him - he would be the villain of this story. Out and out, no doubt about it - Harold would be the villain.

He has all the hallmarks of a classic cyberpunk villain, down to nearly every last detail.

To top that off? The only people who have ever been compared to Harold, morally and intellectually, are themselves villains. Elias, Greer, Control, Root, hell, even Arthur in a twisted way - none of them are good people. They might have good intentions, sometimes, or at least morally grey ones - but good, on balance? They ain’t that.

I made a big post about this last week, and I’ve got a couple other posts I’m thinking about throwing up at some point (once they get fully-formed, thought-wise) that are kind of related, but basically… Harold Finch is not really a “hero.”

He’s a protagonist, certainly. But he isn’t a hero, and he isn’t a ‘good man’ through his own actions - he’s a good man through the influence of others. His father, Nathan, Grace, and, ironically, The Machine - who led him to Grace when he was teaching it morals, and Grace made him a better person, early on. John, Shaw, Fusco, Carter, and - amusingly - even Root have come to influence Harold’s morality since.

By and large, for the better; as The Machine gave Harold Grace, as a way of reminding him what he was trying to be, Harold gave Root the Machine, and her purpose, if somewhat indirectly. Since then, Root has been trying to get Harold to recognise his own responsibilities, and his own ability to contribute to what is going on.

No, scratch that - not his ability. The necessity of Harold’s involvement in the Cold War with Samaritan. And not just Harold-as-he-presents-himself, but Harold as he is.

And behind all those identities, the “concerned third party” lines, the aloofness and emotional distance and intellect? Harold is still the man who created the world’s first AI, and unleashed it on the world to monitor everything that goes on in minute detail, so that it could learn and grow. Harold is the man who decided that his judgementsuperseded the privacy rights of every person on Earth. Decided that his new paradigm, his ability to change the world overnight, was more important than consulting anyone else on the morality of what he could do.

He knew that it could be done, so he did it.

That is Harold Finch, at his core. He is not a good man, though he does good things, sometimes. He is, frankly, a terrifying man. And what we’re seeing so far in Season 4 is suggesting we will only see more of Harold-as-he-is, and less of Harold-as-he-presents-himself, as time goes on.

And it’s amazing.

racethewind10

Anonymous asked:

How canon is root/shaw? Is there a good root/shaw community (fan fic, etc)?

jetgirl78 answered:

First, let me just say that if anyone coming to this show expecting Root and Shaw to have a full blown romance where they declare their love and feelings by shouting it across the hills and end up making out non-stop, THIS IS NOT THAT KIND OF SHOW. This isn’t Grey’s or Rookie Blue where the focus is romantic ships. This show is very, very narrative/plot arc driven and any relationship development is almost subtextual even for the heterosexual ships (not that there has been romance for them either). This isn’t a show where characters sit around and talk about their feelings at any great length. So, please, if you come to this show and are going to YELL “queerbaiting” because Root and Shaw aren’t having the relationship you want because you want something more like Grey’s, you’re basically complaining about your circle expectations not fitting in a square hole and this show is probably not for you.

What is this show giving us and how canon are Root and Shaw? Well, this is a complicated question because I wouldn’t say that Root and Shaw are ALL subtextual because their is blatant flirting going on and it’s VERY much in the fabric and text of the show, but the question becomes about motivation. And to understand the Root and Shaw dynamic, you kind of have to understand the kind of characters they are. They are two people who have never much trusted anyone and who have seen themselves as outliers. These two characters admitting to trusting or needing anyone is a BIG thing. When they met, Root was going to torture Shaw with an iron. Flashforward a season, and Shaw and Root have gotten to a place where they know the other one has their back. In many ways, I see this ship like the Kahlan and Cara relationship from Legend of the Seeker. Two people who SHOULD be enemies but through circumstance have learned to trust each other. And I’m eagerly waiting for an episode where Root and Shaw are trapped in a place and they get into a fight over who will be the one to die so the other may live. Even if we take out the possibility of a canon ladyship, for me, this kind of relationship dynamic is really interesting and one of the reasons why if Root and Shaw never become canon, I’d still like their relationship.

But what about the flirting? Yes, well, Root’s character flirts with Shaw (like shamelessly and relentlessly) because she figured out really quickly that pushing this particular button with Shaw puts Shaw off her game. And I think Root does it to maintain a certain level of control in the relationship, but as Amy Acker has said time and again, she is flirting with her to annoy Shaw (and keep this upper hand in their relationship) or …

image

Honestly, I think it is a little of both. Root comes from a place where she was always and constantly disappointed by people. And then she meets Shaw (and the rest of Team Machine) and I think Shaw was better than she ever thought and has never been disappointed her. So, you can see how Root’s affection for Shaw can be read as coming from a very emotion based place. As for Shaw, a person who has muted emotions and doesn’t trust people easily, I think we can see how much Root means to her now even though she always claims it’s about their mission of saving people.

image

As for this actually happening in canon, it might … it might not. EP Greg Plageman has said he thinks Root and Shaw have a fluid sexuality so it is within the realm of possibility. The revelation that Root and Shaw have had sexual encounters with members of the same sex would NOT be surprising. But then again, I think these two characters view sex as more an itch to scratch and the more compelling narrative thread would be these two people admitting to their emotional connection. Like, for me, the bigger scene would be Root and Shaw admitting they how much they mean to each other and not them making out with each other.  The show did the same “big emotional reveal” between Reese and Carter (and it was beautiful and there was ugly sobbing on my part .. don’t talk to me about Carter).

So to summarize … if you are looking for a show where the two female leads are bad-ass and their relationship is compelling when either viewed as a friendship or something more and all this is playing out within the context of a political and Alias-like action show where every character is a version of Jack Bristow, then you may want to give this show a try. If this doesn’t appeal to you and you NEED this to be canon and will be disappointed with anything less and anything short of love declarations and love scenes will make you say “queerbaity” then… this show is probably not for you. The fandom for this relationship is growing, but it is still pretty small so there isn’t too much in the way of fan fiction.

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racethewind10:

Shaw is the first person (except *maybe* Harold, who created Root’s God-figure) that Root sees as an actual person. Root considered (initially) John nothing more than a pet, almost everyone she interacted with as beneath her, and humans in general as ‘bad code.’ 

Root treats and views Shaw not just as a human being but a human being who is valuable in and of herself and not because Root needs to use her for some reason. Which I think is both telling and a huge freaking deal and I ship it so hard its ridic. 

gigi2690

kriatyrr:

backyarditarian:

widdershinsgirl:

ohgodhesloose:

cheskamouse:

jasoncanty01:

brightcopperpenny:

superpunch2:

Female pilots edited out of the Star Wars movies.

I saw the tweets about this today, and I was like oh yeah, I remember hearing about that.

And then I saw the pictures and just— wow. What it would have meant to have these women in the movie, all this time. I can’t properly articulate it but it’s hitting me unexpectedly hard.

Wow thats a shame, even a nice old lady too.  These Space Valkyries  should have been left in.

They really should have.

ADSVFISIDCNCIDSVHIUEFUHFIDHuvririahfuwvrui4m8ywmu36 8hthfahuiharahfiargnihiurhurhaigoznifrbogirifrbgorbzo154+849848e54645w8va0

WHAT.

THE.

FUCK.

I lived, ate, and breathed Star Wars from age 2 until 2005 when RotS finally beat the enthusiasm out of me, and I have NEVER, EVER in all my reading on behind-the-scenes and makings-of heard of these shots. It’s a shame there was no relaunched edit of the original trilogy they could have slipped these in OH FUCKING WAIT THERE’S BEEN LIKE 3 OF THOSE NOW.

Fuck. FUCK. Whoever decided to edit out and bury these needs to french kiss an angle grinder.

I want to see the old lady in the A-Wing. Seriously, it’s like, she’s somebody’s grandma. Some kid in the Outer Rim Territories got greased by the Empire for seeing something she wasn’t supposed to see, and her grandma, the bush pilot, decided “Fuck this, I’m gonna strap on an fighter and make the Empire fucking PAY for the moment it decided to fuck with MY FAMILY.”

DON’T. MESS. WITH. GRANDMA.

These are quickly being put into the “always reblog” category.

Whenever there is a war, there are women who are warriors. Then they get erased from history. Happens in real wars and fictional ones alike.